Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /home/goldftnm/public_html/wp-includes/class-wp-query.php on line 3760

Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /home/goldftnm/public_html/wp-includes/class-wp-query.php on line 3762

Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /home/goldftnm/public_html/wp-includes/class-wp-query.php on line 3764
- Goldfish-Emergency.com

Gweenie

Home/Gweenie
Gweenie

Gweenie

  • Gweenie commented on the post, Slow moor misses food 1 month ago

    p.s. I was feeding peas, but the new gel food has peas in it, in addition to other things….

  • Gweenie commented on the post, Slow moor misses food 1 month ago

    Thank you, Venus. What you say is very encouraging. And yes, my moor loves pecking around in the gravel. I feed them a little bit several times a day. And I actually melted down the batch of gel food I made and added more gelatin for just the reason you say. The food was breaking up too quickly.
    In addition to the gel food I give them assorted…[Read more]

    • Venus replied 1 month ago

      This is a common concern with goldfish keepers. Some say we shouldn’t keep our fancy fish with the common because they just can’t compete for food, but I’ve always kept them together successfully. By successfully, I mean my fancy fish are, and always have been fat

      To make sure all of your fish get plenty without over feeding, hold food below the surface, and release in a spreading motion. The faster fish may get a little more, but that’s okay, their metabolisms are faster, so they need more food. With this method of feeding, a lot of the food will end up on the bottom in the gravel, which is a good thing

      Avoid feeding floating foods, as this encourages the fish to come to the surface, which can be stressful. Goldfish by nature are bottom feeders and bottom dwellers. The bottom is where they feel safe. The greatly enjoy pecking through the gravel in search of leftover morsels

      Even though the moor is at a disadvantage with it’s poor eye sight, goldfish use their noses to find food in the gravel

      Floating food has air in it, and can cause digestive disorders, leading to floating issues. These foods are actually designed for pond fish, to bring them to the surface for a better show during feeding time. Koi seem to do okay with this type of food. They have amazing digestion, but then, the industry doesn’t breed them to be shaped abnormally. I don’t think we’re doing our poor goldfish any favors by breeding them to exhibit features that should be considered as unhealthy. The fact is, fancy goldfish are more prone to serious issues than common goldfish or Koi

      If you make your own gel food, add an extra package of gelatin for extra staying power. This will give the slower fish a chance to find the food before it breaks down, which is a problem with gel food. I’ve just recently increased the gelatin in The Organic Fish seaweed and shrimp recipe. Our conversation has reminded me I need to edit my gel food recipe book to include the additional gelatin. It makes all the difference

      How many times a day have you been feeding? Are you feeding a variety?

      Most important with feeding is to feed regularly, feeding less more often, as they have no stomachs. Feeding them in this manner makes happy. In the wild they spend most of their time foraging. Most keepers feed only once or twice a day, which is hard on their digestive tract, but the best reason for feeding several times daily is to give them something to do

      Thanks for joining us, and please feel free to chat about the little things as well as the big, Venus

    • Thank you, Venus. What you say is very encouraging. And yes, my moor loves pecking around in the gravel. I feed them a little bit several times a day. And I actually melted down the batch of gel food I made and added more gelatin for just the reason you say. The food was breaking up too quickly.
      In addition to the gel food I give them assorted vegetables and bloodworms.

    • p.s. I was feeding peas, but the new gel food has peas in it, in addition to other things….

    • Venus replied 1 month ago

      Good deal; sounds like you’re on top of it

      I’ve tried adding gel to existing gelatin, and had no success at all. If your method works for you; please share with us

  • Gweenie commented on the post, test kit failure? 2 months ago

    Thank you, Venus. I will get some epsom salts and a pond pump. They sell them at the hardware store, so I can get right on it. How many GPH for my 29 gallons?

    My only concern with getting a pump and ditching the current system is getting through the cycling period again. Is their anything I can do to help establish beneficial bacteria quickly?…[Read more]

  • Gweenie commented on the post, test kit failure? 2 months ago

    Hi Venus.
    I got my my test kit today. I should have re-read your post before ordering and noted your recommendation about getting drops. I got the strips, and I am finding the results confusing.

    I am rather unsure about my results, especially for GH and KH. As you know, the tests change both in hue and darkness after dipping. My results…[Read more]

  • Yes, tilted sideways. I wrote my last response from work, and was going from the visual I had in my head- not checking. In fact, her head is up.

    Sorry for the confusion about what constitutes a floating issue.

  • Hi Venus. Yes, I can and will get a test kit for PH , KH and GH. Will order online right away.
    I am very happy to know that there is a procedure that will let me know what the oxygen levels are.
    I can’t really say that I have noticed my first fish favoring any area of the tank. Maybe more bottom than top… he likes to cruise around there…[Read more]

  • It does have a hood, but I keep the back part uncovered for air flow.
    I did have a pump going in my smaller tank, but when I got this one and saw how much surface action tt creates, I felt like I could probably get away without one. . Water pours down from the top in two places, so there is pretty good movement. I vacuum from the bottom when I…[Read more]

  • Hi Venus.The ammonia test is a strip. The other is nitrite 2, drops. I don’t have testers for the others, All I know is that our water here is pretty hard- it leaves deposits very readily. When I tested for PH years ago, it was 7. I don’t know whether the municipality keeps that steady…

    The new fish is under 3 inches. Both of them are…[Read more]

    • Hi Gweenie, I love a good mystery. A few questions for you.

      What type of test kit are you using; drops or strips?

      You say you tested for ammonia and nitrogen; do you mean nitrites or nitrates or maybe both? You would want zero results for both ammonia and nitrites, but a low reading for nitrates; the third toxin to form in the cycle. This low reading 10 to 20 ppm indicates the cycle is in progress

      What size are these fish; new and old?

      What other parameters do you test? It’s true that in most cases of a fish acting off; the water quality is responsible, but there’s much more to water than ammonia, nitrite and nitrates. Does your test kit include KH, GH and pH? If not, I recommend picking up these testers. These parameters are best tested with drops, but strips work well for ammonia and nitrite if you don’t need complete accuracy, as any reading of these two toxins tell you the cycle is broken, and water treatment must be used. Strips are quite sensitive to them actually, so no matter what type of test you used, I would bet the ammonia and nitrite (if that’s what you tested for) is zero

      Fish poisoned by ammonia clamp their dorsal fins close to the body, and often sit and pout. Ammonia causes discomfort, burning the fish

      The 45 degree angle is a symptom of a female impacted with eggs. Their bottoms float a bit, due to the buoyancy of the eggs. If the fish is three inches or longer, this could be the case.

      Not to mention, being prey fish, some fish take a few to several days to feel comfortable in a new fish house, while some adjust immediately

      No matter, daily water changes never hurt if they’re not too large. If your cycle is in tact, you don’t want to risk a spike

    • Forgot to address the charcoal backfire; good terminology. lol

      The industry has led us to believe we must filter our water, but have you ever wondered what we’re filtering? If your water is healthy, there’s nothing in it to remove. Free floating debris is the only reason to filter water, but charcoal or carbon doesn’t do that. The top loading filters being sold at pet shops as part of the aquarium set up have carbon filter pads included. We’re instructed to replace these pads every few weeks; how convenient for the industry. In the meantime, the filters slows and gets bogged down; they’re not designed to deal with waste

      Goldfish create a great deal of waste, and this is why the HOB, the canister or any other type of filtering system doesn’t work. If you’ve read around the site, I’m sure you’ve seen where I recommend pond pumps for all goldfish houses, big or small. They have sponges over the intake, that collect waste, and keep the water clear, and the pump as well

      The type of aquarium you have, does it have a hood? I’ll Google it, but it seems they’re open, and if this is the case, this is a step in the right direction, as every goldfish tank must be open so the surface is exposed to fresh air

      Let me know if you decide to make the switch or just include a pond pump in your set up, and I’ll guide you

    • Hi Venus.The ammonia test is a strip. The other is nitrite 2, drops. I don’t have testers for the others, All I know is that our water here is pretty hard- it leaves deposits very readily. When I tested for PH years ago, it was 7. I don’t know whether the municipality keeps that steady…

      The new fish is under 3 inches. Both of them are about 2 inches, I would say.

      Would about a 20% a day water change be good? I SO want to gets things stable in there…!

    • Obviously mature enough at 2″. I’ve never been able to relate the 45 degree angle float to anything else, although, I should have asked if the nose was down or up? If impacted with eggs the nose is down

      A pH reading of 7. is extremely low. They say the comfort zone is 7. to 8. but 7 is too low for comfort. In order to fully understand pH, we must test KH first. KH (carbonate mineral) is a part of pH with oxygen being the other part. If we test KH, this gives us an idea of what the oxygen levels are in your fish house. You say your water is really hard, which indicated KH and GH are high. If this is the case, oxygen levels are low in the fish house water

      Is there any way I could convince you to pick up a KH, pH and GH test kit? These are the parameters that measure the value of water

      I think 20% is a safe amount to exchange daily. Are you using water treatment that eliminates chlorine?

      Are the floatie issues completely gone now? If not, is it possible to give us a video (utube is best)

      Also, your number one fish, where does it spend most of its time? Closer to the bottom or the top?

      It’s possible the issue is resolved, but no matter, let’s take a closer look at the quality of your water. Your fish are only as healthy as the water they live in

    • It does have a hood, but I keep the back part uncovered for air flow.
      I did have a pump going in my smaller tank, but when I got this one and saw how much surface action tt creates, I felt like I could probably get away without one. . Water pours down from the top in two places, so there is pretty good movement. I vacuum from the bottom when I do my water changes. Do you think I still need a pump?

    • Well, it’s possible KH is dragging pH down,but there’s a way to find out

      Do this for me

      Test pH in tap water to compare to aquarium water. Is the tap water higher or the same? If higher, do the following

      Using a pitcher, push it deep into the aquarium water filling it. Bring it up and pour it back in. Repeat this action 10 to 15 times. Test pH. Is it higher than the 7

      If the number remains the same, we know oxygen levels are as good as they can be, but KH needs work. If the numbers jump higher, we know oxygen levels are low

    • Hi Venus. Yes, I can and will get a test kit for PH , KH and GH. Will order online right away.
      I am very happy to know that there is a procedure that will let me know what the oxygen levels are.
      I can’t really say that I have noticed my first fish favoring any area of the tank. Maybe more bottom than top… he likes to cruise around there picking over the gravel.
      My second fish with the tilt doesn’t seem to have nose either up or down. I have been at work much of the day, so don’t know if things are improving.
      Yes, I use a water conditioner that removes chlorine and ammonia.
      I am not sure what floatie condition you refer to.
      Thanks so much. I will report back after I get the test kit and have a chance to use it.

    • You had mentioned the fish was at a 45 degree angle? Maybe you mean the fish is tilting sideways? I appreciate your willingness to go to the extreme. As you obviously already know, excellent water makes the world of difference. Your fish appreciate it too

    • Yes, tilted sideways. I wrote my last response from work, and was going from the visual I had in my head- not checking. In fact, her head is up.

      Sorry for the confusion about what constitutes a floating issue.

    • Gweenie, you did the right thing by performing the water changes. Your new fish was losing consciousness; more than likely dying. My thoughts are, the water at the pet shop was lacking in oxygen, and then being bagged was extremely stressful. It was all too much for the fish

      So no worries about impacted eggs or floating issues

      Still, let’s look at that water of yours, and see if we can figure out why the pH is so low. This fish is going to need the best water you can give

      Good job

    • Hi Venus.
      I got my my test kit today. I should have re-read your post before ordering and noted your recommendation about getting drops. I got the strips, and I am finding the results confusing.

      I am rather unsure about my results, especially for GH and KH. As you know, the tests change both in hue and darkness after dipping. My results aren’t a match for both, but best as I can tell, my KH is about 180 and general hardness about 120.

      PH for both aquarium and tap read- I think- 7.0.

      So from what you were saying, it sounds like the KH needs fixing?

    • It sounds like KH is well within the comfort zone, but GH could use a little push. Pick up a bag of Epsom (no other additives) salt. Dissolve one tablespoon per 10 gallons of tank water in warm water. Premix in freshwater before a water change. Epsom is magnesium, and makes up the largest part of GH. GH is an important parameter, but at the same time, if it drops now and then; it’s not a big deal

      KH is another story, but your reading is healthy. Strips always read high. So do drops, but just not ‘as’ high

      KH gives water the ability to support oxygen. KH is responsible for alkalinity, and is a part of pH. The other part of pH is oxygen. Because your KH is high, and your pH is low, this means oxygen levels are low

      Open the entire top of your tank so the surface is exposed to fresh air. If the top has a filter connected, open the flap. Set up a fan so it skims the surface. A computer fan is fine

      Lower water temps to 64f by chilling tank water if necessary; just do your best. Goldfish use less oxygen in colder water, and until we can get the set up right, this will be beneficial

      Add a pond pump to your set up. Only a real pond pump provides the necessary action to eliminate gases from water. These gases are created from waste, and take up space keeping oxygen from entering. Until you have a pond pump, push a pitcher deep into the body of water filling it. Bring it up and pour it out; repeat 10 to 15 times or until you arms ache. This action eliminates gases from water, doing the job a pond pump does, only manually. Test pH after performing this therapy. Is it higher?

      If the pH hasn’t jumped up quite a bit, test pH in tap water. Is the tap the same as the tank water; 7. ppm? If so, you’re probably mistaken at the KH reading. If it is quite a bit higher, all you need is a pond pump to have heavily oxygenated water, and this is what all goldfish and their environments need to be healthy

      The set ups we buy at the pet shop are designed for tropical fish, not goldfish. We have to make a few adjustments if we’re to keep them in aquariums, and this means treating our aquarium more like a pond

      Let me know if you should decide to get a pond pump, and I’ll guide you. All that being said, it’s possible that removing the entire top and setting up a fan could make the difference. The gases (carbon dioxide) I was referring to, if being expelled from the water, hang out over the surface, blocking it from oxygen

      Yes, the strips aren’t easy, but practice makes perfect.

      You might contact your water department and ask for carbonate mineral readings. Then you could compare that to your reading. My guess is, yours is closer to 120 ppm than 180 ppm, that is, unless you live by the sea or if there’s a lot of limestone in your region. Both contribute to a high KH

      How is the fish now? Any more symptoms? It sounds like the fish was without oxygen for an extended time. Pet shops are notorious for bad water

    • Thank you, Venus. I will get some epsom salts and a pond pump. They sell them at the hardware store, so I can get right on it. How many GPH for my 29 gallons?

      My only concern with getting a pump and ditching the current system is getting through the cycling period again. Is their anything I can do to help establish beneficial bacteria quickly? Like rubbing the sponge in the pump against the current filter?

      Both fish are behaving very normally now.

      Thank you for all of your help. I have inadvertently killed goldfish in the past. I want these two to live out their full life cycles.

    • I know just how you feel. We’ve all felt the guilt and the loss, and that’s just why I’m here

      You might find a pump at a local lawn and garden center; something like this; 200 to 300 GPH If you can get, you’ll love the basket over the intake. If you can find a cylinder sponge to fit; they slide on and off easily for rinsing. Some pumps come with sponges; a must have as they act as filters

      Leave your old filter up and running for a few months. In that time, the friendly bug colony will transfer over to the pond pump; the location is preferred by them. If you old filter has a volume control, turn it down gradually; a little bit every week. Reducing the flow encourages them to go elsewhere. If there’s no volume, fasten an aquarium safe sponge of the intake to reduce the flow

    • Here’s a great example https://www.target.com/p/pond-boss-225-gph-pump/-/A-50928515 Love the pond boss

View My Stats