Plants Goldfish Aquarium

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Plants Goldfish Aquarium

Plants goldfish aquarium benefit the environment

Plants goldfish aquarium add to the beauty of the set up as well as benefiting the environment. Green vegetation require light to synthesis nitrates and Co2 from water, their food source. Plants assist in reducing nitrates, creating a safer environment for animal life. You may hear people say they oxygenate the water, but this is a stretch. Carbon dioxide is an atom created from waste. The carbon dioxide atom bonds to oxygen atoms, creating dirty oxygen, or the Co2 molecule. The carbon dioxide molecule is commonly made up of one part Co2 and two parts oxygen. Plants absorb Carbon dioxide molecules during the day, clean them, and release oxygen. This event is very beneficial, however, the carbon dioxide atom is released at night

Planted aquarium

Plants require Co2 in order to grow and maintain health, although too much carbon dioxide in their environment creates an adverse effect on all living creatures, plants and animals alike

In a planted tank with no animals present, Co2 must be added to the environment, but only in low amounts. Co2 should not be added to planted tanks that contain animal life. In fact, where animals are present, the gas should be eliminated by means of a water pump, as it’s ever present, being produced constantly

Choose plants for your goldfish aquarium or pond that are non toxic, and hardy. Most plants prefer quiet water, while goldfish require water with a great deal of action. This action helps to eliminate Co2, keeping the body of water free, and able to absorb oxygen from the air above the surface

Plants in pots may become infected with bad bacteria. Lift and vacuum beneath pots frequently.  Parasites often travel on plants, infecting pet shop aquariums and your fish house as well. Give new plants a salt bath before adding to your fish house. Two tablespoons of aquarium safe salt in one quart of water for five to ten minutes will kill the bad bugs. Rinse with freshwater after the dip

For easy care, choose a free floating plant such as duck weed, hyacinth or water lettuce

Do plants oxygenate water?

Water becomes oxygenated by method of diffusion

Plants Goldfish aquarium

Just like the animals that live in your fish house, plants have no tolerance for ammonia. Ammonia is a toxin that is also created from waste. This toxin attracts beneficial bacteria; their food source, and is the first toxin to form in the nitrogen cycle; critical to life

Some goldfish keepers prefer plastic or silk plants in their aquarium. They’re pretty to look at, but add nothing to the ecosystem

In order for the environment to support plants and animals, the nitrogen cycle must be complete, meaning only nitrates are present

If the plants you add to your set up are edible, your set up completes the circle to aqua life. The fish eat the plants, and create waste. The waste starts the nitrogen cycle that feeds the plants

Plants require light

Our fish don’t require light, but the plants in their environment do. Being omnivorous, vegetation makes up the better part of their diet. In a natural body of water, you’ll see plants in the shallows, where the sunlight can penetrate the water

Keep a healthy balance of vegetation in your goldfish house. In a heavily planted tank, the fish may be overwhelmed by Co2 at night, depriving them of oxygen

Plants goldfish aquarium 

types of plants

Water plants

One plant that is overlooked if not scorned in the world of fish keeping is algae. Algae forms naturally when nitrates are present, feeding on the toxin like no other plant is capable of doing. Made up of diatoms, this living plant provides a healthy food source for our fish, and is the best plant choice for any aquarium or pond

We’re not going to discuss types of plants, the variety is too large. Just make sure to choose plants that are non toxic, and don’t require higher temperatures than your goldfish can thrive in

Learn more about algae living plant

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Author: Brenda Rand

2017-05-28T18:35:09+00:00

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Long live our fish

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