cleaning goldfish aquarium

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When cleaning goldfish aquarium exchange only a portion of the water

A health ecosystem contains living organisms that make the water safe for fish to live in. Goldfish create a lot of waste which creates ammonia, a dangerous and deadly toxin. When ammonia is present, friendly bacteria form to feed on the toxin, converting it to nitrites, and then nitrates. We call this even the nitrogen cycle. Goldfish have no tolerance for ammonia and nitrites, although, they can tolerate nitrates at low levels. Cleaning goldfish aquarium should consist of dumping and replacing all of the tank water

When only nitrates are present, algae forms to feed on the toxin, keeping levels at bay. Most goldfish keepers think of algae as grunge, but it’s really very beneficial. Algae reduces our work load by reducing water changes

We exchange water in order to keep nitrates low, and reduce the amount of utilized waste in the water

Partial water change

Exchange only a portion of your fish house water. Perform the task consistently by exchanging small amounts often, instead of large amount less often

Performing Water Changes

By | 2020-04-02T17:03:10-05:00 August 6th, 2017|Categories: Goldfish Koi Maintenance|Tags: , , |

Water Changes reduce nitrates, increase oxygen and mineral value STEP 8 Buy the Books Water changes must be performed frequently to keep oxygen levels up and nitrates down in our goldfish house. We've learned that beneficial bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen cycle. Without these friendly bugs, goldfish would be poisoned by their own waste. Keeping fish safe in captivity would be a challenge if not impossible without this miracle of nature Without the nitrogen cycle, life would not exist as we know it Nitrates are the third and final conversion in the cycle; tolerated by goldfish at low levels. This toxin can only be removed by means of a partial water change. If the environment in your goldfish house cannot support beneficial bacteria, then it will support harmful bacteria. If bad bugs flourish in your tank or pond, your goldfish won't. It's that simple Cleaning goldfish aquarium Exchange less water more often to keep nitrates at consistent levels Water changes Another reason to perform frequent water changes; goldfish emit a growth hormone dangerous at high levels. Goldfish in overstocked tanks are at risk of being poisoned by these hormones which may stunt growth. These same hormones cause cancer, heart disease and even death Add plants to your set up. Plants feed on nitrates keeping levels at bay. There is one plant that forms naturally in the right conditions with no maintenance, and that's algae Fish are at risk of ammonia and or nitrite poisoning if the cycle has not completed If your tank has not cycled, perform daily water changes between 20% to 30% (depending on stocking levels) for the next 8 to 10  weeks. Use water treatment (enough for entire tank size) that eliminates ammonia, nitrite, chlorine and chloramines Refer to Step 5: Water Treatment: to determine recommended dosages required for making conversions Never perform a 100% water change. Along with the bad bacteria and toxins, you'll be throwing out water that provides nourishment for good bacteria also If your tank has cycled perform bi weekly water changes of 10% to 20% depending on stocking levels. Eliminate chlorine or convert chloramines using water treatment if present Water changes aquarium An overstocked tank requires increased amounts of partial water changes Test fish water before every water change; adjust water changes accordingly. The comfort zone is 20 to 40 ppm with the lower end of the scale being preferred; a buffering zone in case of a spike Here are some tips to keep water changes easier Make sure water buckets have strong and secure handles  Keep the buckets light so they're easy to carry; don't over fill Take your time. Don't rush through bailing water; slow and steady Keep a towel beneath buckets while removing or adding water  Keep filters and pumps in fish water at all times Never use detergents or cleaning agents on goldfish house or equipment Work water over to remove supersaturated gases from tap water Never add water treatment or any other substances directly to goldfish tank Keep a watchful eye on running water from a faucet unattended How [...]

Pond Pumps

By | 2020-04-03T08:27:06-05:00 August 6th, 2017|Categories: Goldfish Koi Maintenance|Tags: , , |

Pond pumps belong in every goldfish and Koi house STEP 7 Buy the Books Pond pumps belong in every goldfish and Koi house. There are many fancy and expensive filtering systems available in all price ranges, some costing hundreds of dollars. Pet shop filters are designed for tropical fish; not goldfish. Standard filtering systems are located at the top of the aquarium where there is little or no waste. Even though there's an intake extension that comes close to the floor, the intake is slow, and it sits to the side of the tank Filters and pumps do much more than push water and filter it, they house beneficial bacteria Goldfish create a lot of waste which accumulates at the bottom of the tank where they rest and feed. Friendly bugs feed on the ammonia created by their waste. The home they live in should be located in the same proximity, encouraging them to build strong colonies, making for a strong cycle Boost pH by performing water changes Water filter verses pond pumps New fish keepers use carbon in their filters, assuming it will keep the cycle from forming; referred to a cycle free tank, but products and others like it are not predictable. Your fish are at risk in a cycle free environment Encouraging consistent pH levels, oxygenated water is the key to a healthy ecosystem pH; Potential of Hydrogen How pond pumps work Pushing water from the bottom to the surface; a simple, submersible pond pump creates a powerful jet stream that clears Co2 from water. No goldfish set up is complete without one, because no other filter or pump provides the necessary action to clear a body of water Goldfish Care Pond pumps typically come equipped with water volume controls. These settings may be turned up or down to obtain the desired action. When cleaning tank or sponges, a higher setting should be powerful enough to clear a cloud in the water quickly Switching from a standard filtering system to a pond pump is easy. Leave your old filter up and running for two to three months after installing a pond pump. If it has a volume control, turning it down will be discourage beneficial bacteria from forming in it, and encourage them to form in the new pond pump. Friendly bugs prefer ponds because they move water faster, making for increased oxygen levels. They sit close to the waste, which produces their food source. Remove the old system after the waiting period, and you're good to go Cleaning goldfish aquarium Friendly bugs require heavily oxygenated water and complete darkness for reproducing  Water filters verses pond pumps Wrap an aquarium safe sponge around the intake of your pond pump. The sponges filters free floating debris from water, and keeps the pump running smoothly. Rinse sponges in old tank water. Even though the sponge may appear clean at the top, grunge accumulates mostly at the bottom. Vacuum beneath the pump. Perform this task weekly; depending on your stocking levels How maintain pond pumps Warning: Make sure sponges completely cover intake valves. Exposed intakes may result [...]

Gravel Vacuum Substrate

By | 2020-04-03T15:14:05-05:00 August 6th, 2017|Categories: Goldfish Koi Maintenance|Tags: , |

GRAVEL vacuum substrate with every water change STEP 3 Buy the book Gravel vacuum substrate in your goldfish aquarium or pond. Goldfish spend most every waking moment in search of food. There's nothing they love better than pecking through gravel and shoving stones around in hopes of finding an uneaten morsel. It's sad to see a goldfish in an aquarium without gravel; there's nothing quite as unnatural for a goldfish. Investing in a gravel vacuum is a must if you have a stone substrate Cleaning goldfish aquarium Because of this instinct; pecking through the gravel, a stone may become lodged in the fish's throat, although it's rare. There's less risk if natural pea gravel is used due to the irregular shape. Round, pet shop gravel is the culprit here. Most fish are able to expel the object on their own; this may happen within a few minutes or a few hours. If not, action may have to be taken to remove the stone  Lodged Stone Using gravel as a substrate makes for clear water by keeping waste and uneaten food from floating freely in the tank, giving it a place to settle. Use a gravel vacuum to remove the debris from the bottom of your goldfish tank. Since we know that friendly bacteria prefer building their colonies in filters and pumps, we can assume that unfriendly bacteria build their colonies in stagnate locations. We also have learned that performing a 100% water change will destroy good and bad colonies alike, but this makes removing debris and waste that has settled in the gravel difficult unless we use a gravel vacuum Gravel vacuum substrate Using a gravel vacuum also helps to reduce carbon dioxide that forms and hangs heavily in the depths of our tanks and ponds. Carbon dioxide is created from the waste your fish produce. Pond pumps do most of work in eliminating these harmful gases that take up space pushing oxygen out Python or siphon A gravel vacuum is actually a short hose or tubing that comes in a few various sizes with a wide mouth on the end of it. Smaller tanks require smaller hose widths to reduce the flow rate Place the mouth of the vacuum at the bottom of your tank. Using a suction device attached to the center portion of the hose, squeeze repetitively. A motorized pump (python) may also be obtained for simplifying the procedure or you may choose to siphon with your mouth to get the action going How use gravel vacuum Have a bucket handy for the old tank water to spill into, and be careful not to suck small fish into the mouth of the vacuum. Very gently, so as not to pollute the water, rake the mouth through the gravel pulling it backwards; not by pushing it forwards; this will clog the mouth of the vacuum and stop the flow of water. When you have completed the task, gently lift the mouth up as you remove it from tank, allowing the [...]

Goldfish House Cleaning

By | 2019-04-01T19:29:42-05:00 November 2nd, 2015|Categories: Goldfish Koi Chat|Tags: , |

Koi Goldfish house cleaning should be a part of our weekly maintenance Just like the house you live in, your goldfish house gets cluttered and dirty over time. There's more to goldfish house cleaning than a water change. Even though you regularly vacuum the gravel and exchange water, grunge builds up, hiding under the items in your aquarium or pond When we vacuum our floors, the dust bunnies under the couch often go unnoticed, the gunk on top of the fridge forgotten and the ring around the tub left for another day. We all do it, and that's okay. There are more important things than having a perfectly clean home, but we also know that when our house is dirty, it can effect our health, and the same is true with our goldfish Goldfish house cleaning Make it a point to do a thorough cleaning in your fish house at least once a month. No, this doesn't mean performing a 100% water change. It means lift those decorations and vacuum beneath them. If they're hollow, rinse in steaming hot water to destroy any bad bacteria building up in the cavity; a favorite spot for bad bugs Koi house cleaning The roots of plants, real or fake are another favorite location for bad bugs. Pull your plants from the gravel or from their container and give them a dip in salt water. Real plants harboring bad bugs will wither and die in a short time, which leads to an unhealthy environment Goldfish house cleaning If you have pond pumps, lift the pump and gravel beneath it or move it a few inches A clean fish house is a healthy fish house you've heard it said, but don't over clean. Waste is the foundation of a natural ecosystem. One of the biggest mistakes goldfish keepers make is performing 100% water changes and cleaning their filters and pumps 10 Steps to Goldfish and Koi Keeping All rights Author: Brenda Rand

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